What Year Was The Good Friday Agreement Signed

What Year Was The Good Friday Agreement Signed

The Northern Ireland Assembly would be elected every five years and chaired by an executive of ministers, which would require the participation of parties on both sides of the Community. The agreement brought together republicans and trade unionists following a referendum in Northern Ireland on 22 May 1998, both in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. In Northern Ireland, people were asked: “Do you support the agreement reached in the multi-party negotiations on Northern Ireland and presented in Command Paper 3883?” The participation rate was 81.1 per cent, of which 71.1 per cent argued in favour of approval. In the Republic of Ireland, people were asked: “Do you support the proposed constitutional amendment contained in the stated bill, nineteenth Amendment of the Constitution Bill, 1998?” The participation rate was 55.6%, of which 94.4% supported the proposed amendment to the Constitution1.1 The Irish and British governments set up for the reintegration of paramilitary prisoners into society through the creation of jobs, the conversion and promotion of educational opportunities, the European Union created in 1998 an aid infrastructure based on the grant of the European Fund for Peace and Reconciliation. It has been reported that the Northern Ireland Voluntary Trust, based in Belfast, manages the fund. In addition, more than 26 community projects of ex-convicts have been implemented across Northern Ireland, with regard to education, placement, financial and social counselling, housing and family accommodation in Ireland.1″The Good Friday Agreement – Prisoners,” BBC News, www.bbc.co.uk/northernireland/schools/agreement/policing/prisoner… After the peace agreement, the loyalist Volunteer Force – a Protestant paramilitary group in Northern Ireland – declared an “unequivocal” ceasefire before the referendum and put it in no.2 After the referendum, On 22 May 1998, a bomb exploded in the town of Omagh, 55 miles west of Belfast, the hard-right Republican group, the Real Irish Republican Army (RIRA), a secessionist faction. The attack killed 28 people and injured more than 200.3 Immediately after the bombing, RIRA apologised and called for a ceasefire.4 As part of the agreement, the British Parliament repealed the Government of Ireland Act 1920 (instituted by Northern Ireland, The Republic of Ireland amended Articles 2 and 3 of the Irish Constitution, which asserted a territorial right to Northern Ireland. In August, the Republican Socialist Party of Ireland, which belongs to the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) paramilitary group, announced a ceasefire, ending its 23 years of violence. Nevertheless, the group continued to oppose the peace agreement signed in April.5 The ceasefire was maintained for the rest of the year.

Northern Ireland political parties that approved the agreement were also invited to consider the creation of an independent advisory forum, which would represent civil society, with members with expertise on social, cultural, economic and other issues, and would be appointed by both administrations. In 2002, a framework structure was agreed for the North-South Advisory Forum, and in 2006 the Northern Ireland Executive agreed to support its implementation.

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